Political strategist, Joe Trippi, dissects the 2012 election

Political strategist, Joe Trippi, dissects the 2012 election

Joe Trippi lectured to political science students on Nov. 12. It was held in the Physician's Auditorium. (Photo by Chantelle Simmons)

On Nov. 12, nationally recognized political strategist Joe Trippi spoke at the Department of Political Science’s convocation of majors event in the Physician’s Auditorium at 7 p.m. Trippi went in-depth on how Barrack Obama won the presidential election, why Mitt Romney lost and the future of both the Republican and Democratic parties.

Trippi noted that family and friends now have the power to influence people in a way corporations cannot.”What we’re seeing is different from the usual. Social media starts from the bottom. Corporations and government no longer have power. You do,” he said.

Trippi also discussed the importance of campaign mobilization and how the Obama campaign utilized it well. He said that through figuring out what potential voters liked, such as their favorite soda or gas station, the Obama campaign was able to get different groups together in support for one candidate.

It is in this way, that the individual is in control. Trippi stated, “Any individual has the power to change the politics of their locality…and both parties have become transactional. Trying to cut a deal with you for your vote,” Trippi said.

Trippi then discussed the demographic issues regarding the Republican Party which correlated with Mitt Romney losing the election. He declared that getting the white vote will no longer win the electoral college and explained how the Romney campaign overestimated its impact. “[The] white population declines two points for every four years,” he said.

He went on to state that  the Republican Party has become an older white male party, and that if changes are not made soon on social policy issues such as immigration, the party will move further away and become a national fail. He also said that the Republicans did not mobilize and that demographics and technology are moving against them.

A question and answer session occurred after the speech in which questions about the removal of the electoral college, Republicans changing positions on certain issues in the future and third party progress were asked and discussed.

Trippi predicted that a third party candidate will become president within the next 10 years, and one of the two main parties will not exist.

“You don’t need a party anymore,” he said.

He then gave advice on how to empower and mobilize American voters. “The key is not to be Goliath, but to give the Davids the slingshots,” Trippi said.

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Authored by: Chantelle Simmons

There are 2 comments for this article
  1. mat catastrophe at 11:24 am

    A candidate elected from the flaming ruins of one of today’s two major parties is not the same as a third party candidate being elected.

    Third parties have failed for decades at the type of local-first organizing, campaigning, and winning elections that would lay the groundwork for them to taken seriously at the top. The persistent whining of the Greens, Libertarians, and whomever else every four years at being excluded from the Presidential debates is very much like a freshly graduated kid with a business degree complaining that JP Morgan bank didn’t take his application to be CEO seriously.

    As far as not needing parties at all, that contradicts what he said in the previous sentence and is some more techno-utopia nonsense that’s all the rage these days. Parties will continue to exist for a long time and while the GOP is destined for a long four years right now, it’s almost to soon to predict their total demise (especially since some of its sharper members – and even some of the duller ones – have finally figured out why they didn’t win the Presidency this year, even if they did succeed at smaller (and often more important) levels).

  2. Chantelle Simmons Author at 12:40 pm

    Well said.

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