NoMo residents homeless no more

NoMo residents homeless no more

The exterior of 930 NoMo remains under construction while students move in.

The exterior of 930 NoMo remains under construction while students move in. (Photo by Carson Schafer)

On Saturday, after a ten day exile, students were finally allowed to move in to their swanky new apartments at 930 NoMo.

Students came back from summer break eager to enjoy the luxury pool, tanning salon, fitness center, waterfront views and other countless amenities NoMo boasts on their website ( 930nomo.com). Instead, would-be residents found themselves sharing cramped hotel rooms with no kitchen, enjoying the view of Lockwood Blvd.

Connor Crouch, sophomore accounting major, was temporarily accommodated in the Charleston Marriott. “It was a nice hotel, but sharing a room wasn’t ideal considering everyone expected to be in NoMo in their own room,” he said.

The delays came as a shock after the complex spent all of Spring semester on an aggressive on-campus marketing campaign, complete with student representatives, free swag and rewards for signing a lease.

Kristin Clark, a communication major in her senior year signed her lease in May. “It was super easy, they were nice, it looked nice, I didn’t have to put down a deposit or anything.”

The $35 million, 430-bed complex was set to open up in time for classes to start, but delays in construction meant students were left in local hotels until Sept. 5, a week and a half after their expected move in.

Crouch had signed his lease in July and was “extremely bummed out” to find that a week before move in his fully furnished three bedroom would not be ready for him and his roommates.

However, just because they were homeless doesn’t mean Crouch, Clark and their fellow exiles weren’t taken care of.

“They handled all of their residents’ situations pretty nicely,” he said. Displaced students were given $30 a day for food, which was “more than enough cash.”

Students like Clark who lived close enough to stay at home were given $30 per day off their rent for the next month.

David Helfrich, CEO of CampusWorks, told the Post and Courier, “The 930 NoMo tenants are our top priority in this circumstance, and the team is making every effort to make this transition as seamless as possible.”

For some, this just wasn’t enough.

“They wanted to be good; I could tell they were trying,” Clark said. “I found a sub-lease because I was done dealing with them and done worrying about it…At one point they stopped answering the phones, I called like four times a day and no one would answer.”

Clark left her NoMo apartment in favor of a place closer to campus and was never reimbursed for her August rent in an apartment she never used.

Crouch opted to stick with his lease, despite ongoing construction on the outside of the building.

“I love my apartment,” he said, but there are still some issues, like “windows being sealed shut and bedrooms being smaller than roommates’ bedrooms for the exact same amount of money.” NoMo employees weren’t responsive when he brought up these concerns.

Maybe a few pool parties, barbecues and volleyball games later the new residents will forget about the whole ordeal and fall in love with 930 NoMo.

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Authored by: Carson Schafer

Following in the footsteps of many great authors before her, Carson chose to begin her writing career with journalism. She's been writing news stories since high school and now writes for CisternYard News. She came to Charleston as a transfer after a two-year sojourn in the icy mountains of Utah and never looked back. She keeps busy by reading, playing video games and working at the Children's Museum as an expert in cardboard swords, dragons and pirate adventures. After graduation she will be setting off on her own pirate adventure, conquering the globe in her trusty VW van.

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