Tattoo Tuesday: The Razor and the Rose

Tattoo Tuesday: The Razor and the Rose

Kids here in Charleston are itching to get inked. Sophomore Liam Hodges hit the tattoo parlor recently, scratching his itch for the ninth time.

“A lot of people say that, when you get your first tattoo, you either never get another one or go crazy and get addicted,” Hodges said. “I guess you could say I got a little addicted. I just like the physical manifestation of thought.”

His most recent tattoo is featured below.

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Located on upper left arm (Photo by Taylor Johnson)

“I thought about it, and thought about it. I’ve always found beauty in roses, and one of the most iconic American pieces is a rose. Rather than adding color, I decided to do it in black to kind of look at the immortalization of death,” Hodges said. “We look at death as something that’s feared or respected on either end of the spectrum, and I lean more toward respect. The straight razor was impulsive, but that was more a cry to American traditionalism.”

It is a simple, meaningful design, and Hodges’s only piece that includes a dash of color.

“People see, ‘Oh, it’s just a razor; it’s just a rose,’ but to me,” Hodges said, “it [means] something a little more brutal…a nice contrast between brutal artistry and simplistic elegance.”

Hodges has eight other tattoos, including a grenade on his ribs, a Celtic triskelion mandala on his chest (featured below), the words “A smooth sea never made a skilled sailor” adorning his shoulders and several more. All have been drawn by tattoo artists in Charleston.

A celtic triskelion mandala. (Photo by Taylor Johnson)

A celtic triskelion mandala (Photo by Taylor Johnson)

“I enjoy representing local artistry,” he said.

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Authored by: Taylor Johnson

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