UPDATE: North Dakota Access Pipeline developers predict completion after Trump victory

UPDATE: North Dakota Access Pipeline developers predict completion after Trump victory

President-Elect Donald Trump may ensure that the North Dakota Access Pipeline gets built without further delay, which could drastically harm the environment (Photo By Gage Skidmore via Flickr Creative Commons).

Donald Trump may ensure that the Dakota Access Pipeline gets built without further delay. (Photo courtesy of Gage Skidmore via Flickr Creative Commons)

President-elect Donald Trump’s victory has had a large impact on the future of the U.S. – the latest prediction for the country being the imminent completion of the Dakota Access Pipeline, despite the protest of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

In a statement issued Tuesday, Energy Transfer Partners of Dallas has confirmed that the work on the pipeline is finished, except for tunneling under the Missouri River. However, the company still needs a final easement from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to complete the project.

On Wednesday, the Army Corps of Engineers repeated its request to ETP to stand down from the project while the issue of reconsidering the permits and easement is resolved. While the company has not made any official move toward completing the pipeline, they have begun gathering equipment and hope to be ready to begin drilling within two weeks.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II has asked President Obama to reroute the pipeline, although any cease and desist from the president will likely be temporary, due to Trump taking office in January.

Americans have been protesting the construction of the North Dakota Access Pipeline, which could pollute the water supply of the Standing Rock Tribe (Photo by Fibonacci Blue via Flickr Creative Commons).

Americans have been protesting the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which poses environmental risks. (Photo courtesy of Fibonacci Blue via Flickr Creative Commons)

ETP began construction of the pipeline began before it had all of the permits and easements in hand. Additionally, the Standing Rock Sioux and other tribes claim that they were never meaningfully consulted in the project.

According to Archambault in a quote given to The Seattle Times:

 “The only path forward for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is a decision that denies the easement or subjects it to a full environmental-impact statement and tribal consultation.”

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Authored by: Scott Harvin

Scott Harvin is a sophomore Communication major with a minor in International Studies in the Honors College at the College of Charleston. Originally from Sumter, South Carolina, he is thrilled to be able to call the wonderful city of Charleston his new home, where he cannot wait to watch the next three years of his life unfold. Other than his academic career at the College, Scott is also a Resident Assistant in McAlister Residence Hall, a tour guide for Charleston 40, a member of the Student Ambassador Program and a News Contributor for CisternYard News. All of this can only mean two things: first, he knows pretty much anything anyone could ever want to know about the College and second, he never sleeps. Despite this, he still finds time to explore his passions for music, photography and adventure, collecting vinyl records while traveling the southeast with close companions to root out the best experiences, restaurants and events the world has to offer. He does all of this while pursuing his ultimate dream: becoming a journalist for a major news branch, preferably in New York, where he hopes to live out the American Dream. “You may call him a dreamer, but he’s not the only one.”

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